HOW TO DO DISTRIBUTOR CAP AND ROTOR REPLACEMENT IN CARS

HOW TO DO DISTRIBUTOR CAP AND ROTOR REPLACEMENT IN CARSWhat are the Distributor Rotor and Cap?

When the engine is running, high voltage generated by the ignition coil travels through the coil wire to the ignition rotor. As the ignition rotor turns in the distributor, the rotor distributes the spark by sending it in a synchronized order through the spark plug wires to the spark plug located in each of the engine’s cylinders.

The distributor is a main component of the ignition system. It takes very high voltage and delivers it to fire the spark plugs.

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Facts to Note:

When the distributor rotor and cap are changed, the entire ignition system should be examined.

After changing the distributor rotor and cap, the ignition wires will need to be reinstalled.

How to Fix:

Check the ignition system.

Replace the cap and rotor if found faulty.

Re-check the ignition system.

Check ignition timing if needed.

Our Proposal:

Whenever your vehicle has routine upkeep or servicing, the ignition system should be examined thoroughly. If you ever notice your ignition system having a hard time (such as your car having trouble turning on or staying on), then you should schedule an inspection.

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Common signs indicating you may need to change the Distributor Rotor and Cap:

Engine misfires.

Car does not start.

Noises from the engine.

Check engine light is on.

Importance of this service:

The distributor rotor and cap is used when the engine is running. During this time, high voltage is generated by the ignition coil, and sent through the coil wire to the ignition rotor. This rotor turns inside the distributor, and as it does so, it evenly distributes sparks to the spark plugs, through the spark plug wires. The spark plugs then use this spark to ignite the fuel mixture, which allows the engine to keep running.

If the distributor rotor and cap malfunction, the voltage from the ignition coil won’t be redistributed to the spark plugs, and your engine will either have a hard time running, or won’t run at all.